VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Any info. on this bike?? posted by: John Straub on 12/6/2005 at 9:17:05 PM
I have come across an old ladies bicycle. It looks to be late 60's-70's. It is called an Easy Tour by Grantsport. It is a 3 speed. Any info. on this bike would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.
by: 65.203.231.219


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Any info. on this bike?? posted by Joe on 12/8/2005 at 7:50:09 AM
These were sold by W.T. Grant or Grant City stores. The chain went out of business in 1975. Grant's was sort of a cross between a 5 & 10 store and an early K-Mart. They disappeared about the time that K-Mart's started popping up. K-Mart had originated from Grant's main competitor Kresge, and probably was one of the main contributors to there demise. Some info on Grant's can be found at:
http://www.taxgloss.com/Tax-Department_Stores_U_-_Z-/W._T._Grant.html

I had a few of these bikes a few years back, both were pretty low end models. One was a green three speed, the other was a 5 speed in blue. Both had one piece cranks, steel calipers and levers, and steel rims. The quality was somewhere along the lines of a any other department store bike from that same period. These seem to turn up every so often, mostly in areas that had a local Grant's store.



by: 71.251.132.171

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Any info. on this bike?? posted by John on 12/9/2005 at 6:26:11 AM
Thank you for the info. Joe. I couldn't find any information on this bike anywhere!! Just wondering if it was worth cleaning up. Thanks again.

John
by: 216.166.130.148

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Any info. on this bike?? posted by Susan Hansen on 5/14/2006 at 11:38:47 PM
I have an old Grantsport womens lightweight bicycle. The model is called an Aquarius. The color is yellow. The tires are flat so I can't ride it. I think it is a 6 speed. Is it worth fixing up? It was free. Thanks. susan
by: 66.230.86.68






AGE / VALUE:   Olmo road frame posted by: don verde on 12/4/2005 at 9:39:36 PM
I have an Olmo road bike, I can only speculate that it is from the 70's made of columbus tubing, and has a serial number on the seat tube right below where the seat post fits in. the serial number is E269. I has a paint job by cycle art in california that is the italian red white and green. The frame is in perfect shape, no dents or bumps the paint has scrapes and chips its not bad, but it's not perfect either. I'd like to try to figure out how much a frame like this is worth. It has a Campy italian bottom bracket in place and a non-campy headset.
by: 69.86.33.11







VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Schwinn Super Sport posted by: Jim Warga on 12/4/2005 at 1:38:13 PM
Does anyone have experience installing a modern(threaded or threadless)fork in an old chromoly SS frame?I would like to take advantage of newer stems and bars,and the original bearings are notchy anyway,so....With a 105 crankset,Sora brake/shifters,Brooks B17 saddle,modern wheels and tires,this bike is a lot of fun.Have rode 5000 miles this year and now considering some winter improvements.Any help is appreciated.
by: 70.111.212.202


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Schwinn Super Sport posted by Kurt K. on 12/4/2005 at 3:10:55 PM
"Modern" in terms of what? Material?

You'll have to convert to threadless if you want to 'take advantage' of the modern stems that clamp onto the fork's outside perimiter.

Otherwise, most modern threaded forks aren't any better or worse then the steel one in your Schwinn right now, and the only upgrade I could think of in the department of threaded forks would be one made of Reynolds 531 steel - aluminum forks are simply too harsh to make for comfortable riding.

P.S.: I recently built up my Nishiki with a modern, sealed Ritchey Logic headset for the bottom race, and an NOS Hatta sealed on top. Fit like a glove. Would have used the top Ritchey race, but the rest was made for threadless.

Take care,

-Kurt
by: 205.188.117.5

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Schwinn Super Sport posted by jim on 12/5/2005 at 1:03:42 AM
Does anyone have a realistic reply ,based on real experience with these bikes?I realise that modern components will change the ride quality,the problem is that the steerer tube will only accept an 833" stem.I have a chrome fork from an earlier SS (1966),but the steerer is too short.Can anyone help here?
by: 70.111.212.202

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Schwinn Super Sport posted by Corey on 12/5/2005 at 6:02:07 AM
Hi Jim, (or both Jims?)
I recently upgraded my 1" threaded steel Spinner fork on my '88 Cannondale to a Time/Cannondale Slice threadless carbon w/steel steerer, resulting in a better damped ride and paring four ounces (1/4 lb.) off the front end. And it looks quite good.

The question on your Super Sport is whether it will accept a regular 1" threadless fork and headset. If so then you can use a current carbon fiber threadless fork. Speaking for myself, I once changed an old style American threaded department store tandem fork to a regular 1" mountain bike threaded fork with a modified headset (a mish-mash of Wald cups, Shimano 600 races and bearings). Hopefully it wouldn't be necessary to cobble a headset like that for the SS.

I would recommend a carbon Easton fork or maybe a generic with a steel steerer. They don't flex like an all-carbon 1" fork, (all-carbon only works in 1 1/4" headtubes, less flex in my opinion), but still damp road vibration better than steel, making for a better ride. Then add a FSA sealed bearing headset, (good price/performance ratio) that you can adjust and forget about. A threadless stem and bar combo flexes less than an old threaded stem and gives a wide range of ergonomic (or not) positions and widths. After not liking ergonomic bend bars, I'm using a Profile ergo bar that I discovered I liked.

The other problem you might run into is the length of the front brake caliper bolt. It might (most likely) have to be lengthened or the whole caliper changed.

I can't remember at the moment if the standard 1" headset cups will fit in your frame, if not either some careful shimming or some headtube cutting with the proper headset tool would fix that.

Good luck! Corey
by: 4.253.70.135

   RE:RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Schwinn Super Sport posted by Andrew Martin on 12/5/2005 at 1:50:38 PM
Hello,the outer diameter of the Schwinn steer tube is the same size as standard 1" threaded steer tube.You should'nt have a problem with the correct length steerer.The lower headset bearing race might pose a problem because there are two sizes (sorry I don't know the sizes off hand)but you can always shim,file or get the correct headset.I'd go for it.Being able to adjust height and reach alone will improve ride quality.
by: 207.200.116.137

   carbon forks posted by John E on 12/5/2005 at 4:29:17 PM
The San Diego cycling community just lost an experienced 44-year-old member when his carbon fork snapped. Check your equipment frequently, friends.
by: 66.185.168.82

   RE:carbon forks posted by Kurt K. on 12/5/2005 at 10:07:09 PM
And in addition, may I note that my LBS has at least one bike in for servicing due to a snapped carbon fork leg.

I don't trust (or believe in) carbon - never have, never will.

Steel is real!

Take care,

-Kurt
by: 205.188.117.5

   RE:RE:carbon forks posted by Corey on 12/6/2005 at 6:30:45 AM
Like other structural designs, the issue of longevity or strength in bicycles isn't the material used: it is the robustness of design engineering and quality of assembly. Name brand (Easton, Look, Time, Calfee, Kestrel, Trek) carbon fiber has greater fatigue life than steel or aluminum, only titanium (3/2.5) has a greater (virtually infinite) cycles-to-failure lifetime.

But getting back to a fork retrofit... from what the others are saying it sounds like the modern crown race should mate right up with the head tube in the Super Sport with a threadless headset. Which would look fairly cool on that bike. Especially with a light weight modern seatpost!

Corey

by: 4.253.68.232

   carbon fork safety posted by John E on 12/6/2005 at 4:03:38 PM
Corey, I concur that design and workmanship determine the lifespan of any bicycle fork, frame, crank, stem, etc., irrespective of the material used, but why do we hear about so many fractured carbon forks, but virtually never any failed steel forks? Is the typical steel fork simply generally more over-engineered than the average carbon fork? I can readily accept the small weight penalty my 10-to-11 kg road bikes bear, if it increases my personal safety.
by: 66.185.168.82

   RE:carbon fork safety posted by Kurt K. on 12/7/2005 at 1:48:23 AM
I'm not contesting that all carbon fiber is 'made out of the same mold'. It is very true that different grades and qualities of carbon fiber exist, just the same as with steels and aluminum alloys, and that you will find better quality carbon fiber on the top-notch machines.

However, may I note that the bikes which I observed at the local bike shop with cracked carbon forks were some of the most renouned names currently in the industry, two of which I remember distinctly; Klein and Orbega. Both bikes were not more then a year old, and high ranking in their placement of their respective model lines' hierarchy.

-Kurt
by: 152.163.100.199

   RE:RE:carbon fork safety posted by Corey on 12/7/2005 at 6:41:47 AM
Had the Klein and the Orbea been crashed?

Corey
by: 4.226.222.3

   RE:RE:RE:carbon fork safety posted by Kurt K. on 12/8/2005 at 1:00:32 AM
If you call riding over a pothole "crashing", yes.

Carbon isn't good for urban riding - too much of a chance of cracking your fork (followed by your neck) in such incedents.

-Kurt
by: 64.12.116.199

   RE:RE:RE:RE:carbon fork safety posted by Corey on 12/8/2005 at 8:04:54 AM
The following is from Reynolds Composites, who make the Ouzo carbon forks, which in general people think are some of the best, and True Temper (Alpha Q), from an article by Lennard Zinn about carbon forks and their weight limits. (The link is here [cut and paste], with some interesting quotes from other manufacturers.)
Corey
http://www.velonews.com/tech/report/articles/3270.0.html

From Reynolds:
After considerable testing and thought on the matter we find the question of "fork life" in terms of time to be a tough question to answer. Our fatigue testing would indicate that well built composite forks are far superior to metal forks with cycle counts running hundreds of thousands of cycles rather than tens of thousands. These tests are also run at much higher loads than metal forks can withstand further demonstrating the durability of composite materials. Based simply on fatigue life a well made and properly installed composite fork should last virtually indefinitely if the bike is not crashed or otherwise abused.

---Mike Lopez
Reynolds Composites

From True Temper (Alpha Q forks):
No, we don't have a published weight limit on the pro fork or the big guy fork. The SUB 3 has a printed weight limit of 200 lbs (rider) but in testing it is stronger than many forks without limits.

Part of that is for marketing. People want the lightest equipment they can get away with.

Our Pro does not have a limit set for it.

The failure mode is not catastrophic. A broken fork will crack near the crown and allow more movement. It will feel "soft" because it will flex more under braking. The rider will see cracks on the outsides of the crown. The rider can ride home and remove the fork without danger. This failure mode is preferred to forks that can break and cause a wreck.
--Bert Hull
True Temper Sports





by: 4.89.241.190

   RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:carbon fork safety posted by Kurt K. on 12/8/2005 at 4:21:53 PM
Rubbish! Marketing pooh-pooh, that's what it is.

And, my dear fellow, may I note that the forks which I have seen have all broken 3 inches up from the dropout, on the fork blade, and not the crown?

-Kurt
by: 64.12.116.199

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Schwinn Super Sport posted by Paul on 12/10/2005 at 12:30:06 AM
I'm with Kurt on the carbon(plastic) fork issue. Contrary to some crap you may read in the magazines, carbon does not smooth out the ride on a bike. That myth was pushed by some lowlife at a magazine to make some manufacturer buy more advertising. And somehow the myth took off from there.
We all know the magazines would never lie to it's readers, right??? (snicker)Keep the fork on your bike steel. Besides it would look stupid on that nice old bike.
by: 4.228.141.174

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Schwinn Super Sport posted by Kurt K. on 12/10/2005 at 2:32:25 AM
Hear, Hear, Paul. At least someone here can see through the marketing hype.

It should be rather obvious that the stiff and brittle consistency of carbon forks will emit a ride quality similar to the properties of the material it is made out of.

Likewise, the malleability of most steel frames and forks make for a smoother ride, absorbing the roughness of the road.

That reminds me...

I will never forget the day I ran into a particular thread on a modern road cycling message board.

One of the fellows had just found himself a Schwinn Varsity (*snicker*), and wanted to know if he could lighten it a bit (*guffaw*). The spandex boys immidiately suggested a carbon fork (*uncontrollable laughter*).

To this day, I will never forget that. I wonder if he actually did so. I can just imagine a Varsity with a carbon fork. Can you say "contradiction in terms?"

-Kurt


by: 205.188.117.5

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Schwinn Super Sport posted by Paul on 12/10/2005 at 6:24:36 AM
To Jim Warga: To get back to the issue of your stem/handlebar setup, is the fork you have original? I don't recall if the fork was cro-moly, but it had tubular legs, and not flat forged like the Varsity. I think it would do no good to "modernize" your bike. If your headset has become indexed, you can knock the cups out and turn them when you reinstall, and it will help with the indexing.
Or just buy a NOS headset.
by: 4.228.240.95

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Schwinn Super Sport posted by Maurice on 12/13/2005 at 3:33:21 AM
If anyone has an early chrome Super Sport fork - I need one for a'66 I'm working on - to fit a 24 inch frame center crank to top of seatmast - or 22 inch frame center to center - any help appreciated - Thanks
by: 64.12.116.199

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Schwinn Super Sport posted by Maurice on 12/13/2005 at 3:34:34 AM
If anyone has an early chrome Super Sport fork - I need one for a'66 I'm working on - to fit a 24 inch frame center crank to top of seatmast - or 22 inch frame center to center - any help appreciated - Thanks
by: 64.12.116.199

   RE:RE:RE:carbon fork safety posted by pat Lavery on 12/18/2005 at 2:54:58 AM
While I was not a witness to the event, on one of our club
rides, a rider on a carbon frame bike and a dog collided
resulting in a broken frame. I don't know how the dog fared . For me, I'll stick with steel or aluminum.
by: 68.33.6.106

   RE:RE:RE:RE:carbon fork safety posted by JB on 12/18/2005 at 11:54:01 PM
While on a 50 m cruise, witnessed a dude on a carbon frame turn too soon into SAG, hit some rocks, carbon fork snapped like a chicken bone several inches above front drop out...stick with steel
by: 65.140.206.246






AGE / VALUE:   HUMBER GEAR TO GEAR posted by: CHRIS BRUMMER on 12/3/2005 at 9:09:25 PM
I'm looking for information regarding a Humber bicycle that is driven by 3 gears. I beleive it is from the late 1800's-early 1900's. I do have very interesting information about it. I'm looking for information on its value and if it is actually a Humber. The seat does have Humber engraved in it. I can not find a serial#. Does Diamond Jim Brady or Lilian Russell ring a bell?
Curious Owner
by: 68.237.143.75







VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Campy Sportman hub posted by: Paul on 12/3/2005 at 6:48:16 AM
I've been a Campy fan for more years than I care to admit, and I came across a Gitane Hosteller with Campy Sportman hubs. I have never seen or heard of these before. Does anybody out there know anything about them? I've seen a Sportman rear der, but never the hubs.
by: 4.228.240.116